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850nm vs. 940nm, IR Wavelength Comparison for CCTV Applications

There are two common IR wavelengths used in CCTV applications today. IR or Infrared wavelengths are measured in ‘nm’ or nanometers, which are used to specify the wavelength of electromagnetic radiation near the visible part of the light spectrum. Visible light ranges from about 390 to 700nm. The IR in CCTV applications take over from there, commonly 850nm and 940nm, which allow us to see images that would normally fall outside of our visible range, thus IR Illuminator. These IR LED’s are used to produce, or improve ‘Night Vision’ capabilities for security cameras.

visible-light-wavelength

 

Although the IR wavelengths 850nm and 940nm, respectively, are fairly similar in performance, there are a few important differences worth noting. The use of IR LED’s in security cameras has become commonplace as technology has improved dramatically and cost has come down. Generally, the great majority of security cameras or CCTV Cameras are sensitive to the 850nm wavelength. Although the IR light is invisible to the human eye, the IR LED’s will produce a faint red glow when looking directly at the camera or source.

The main advantage of the 940nm wavelength is that the IR LED’s do not produce any visible glow. In other words, they are completely invisible and can be used in applications that are required to be more covert. In fact, many people refer to them as ‘Covert IR’. This type of IR is also useful in places where a red glow may be mistaken as a signal and can not be used. The disadvantage of 940nm is that they are about 30-40% less effective and will illuminate less distance.LUMI-390

When using a separate, or stand-alone IR Illuminator such as the LUMI-240 IR Illuminator , it is important to make sure your CCTV camera is sensitive to the same wavelength as emitted by the illuminator. In other words, if the illuminator is 850nm, your security camera must be sensitive to that wavelength. Most cameras are sensitive to 850nm. Security Cameras that are 940nm are available as well, but much less common.

Most Security Cameras with built in IR LED’s, use an IR Cut Filter in order to maximize different lighting conditions during the day or night. During the daytime, the filter is on in order filter out Infrared Light, that way, color images are not distorted by IR Light. During the nighttime, the IR cut filter is automatically switched off to allow infrared light to enter the camera. The camera switches to IR Mode (Black and White) which is more sensitive to Infrared light.

IR technology has made great strides in recent years which is a great benefit to consumers and commercial CCTV users. SMART IR, Black Film Technology and STARVIS Sensors are among the exciting new Night Vision improvements in the surveillance industry. It is now possible to see extreme distances during day and night with high powered IR LED’s and IR Illuminators. If you are planning a CCTV Installation that requires night vision, it is certainly beneficial to understand the options that are available to you. At Ellipse Security, we are always ready to assist with your planning and design needs.

Have questions?

Call us Toll-Free at 877-880-7728

We Love to Talk to People about Security Cameras!

 

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How to hook up Multiple Monitors to your Security Camera System

A  facet of security camera system applications that we are asked about frequently is, “How Do I Hook Up Several Monitors to my Security Camera System?” Some Security DVRs have both a HDMI and a VGA output. A few of these can be used simultaneously, but most are designed to use one or the other. The former can be helpful if you have a HDMI monitor and a VGA Monitor but not if you want to hook up several of either. The most effective way to accomplish viewing on multiple monitors is by using a HDMI splitter or VGA splitter. Specifically, a splitter-amplifier which will guarantee full signal strength to multiple outputs. The correct splitter will be powered, rather than a stand alone splitter (non-powered) which is not effective.

Hooking up several monitors to your security camera system can be beneficial in a number of ways. It is possible to hook up 2, 4, 8, or more, monitors to simultaneously display your camera images. This allows monitoring in areas where there is no network connection or PC. In residential applications, for instance, you can check who is at the front door without leaving your bedroom or living room. In commercial applications, multiple monitors can be used to monitor the manufacturing process, freight and loading dock, sales floor, and any number of other applications.

With the right equipment, the process is easy and affordable. Since most new Security DVRs have an HDMI output, we will use HDMI as an example, but the process is similar with VGA or CVBS as well. Below you will find a series of diagrams that will outline the connection configurations for hooking up multiple monitors. We included the two, and four way below and hooking up eight monitors just repeats the process.

Here is a simple diagram to hook up two monitors:

  1. Connect the DVR’s HDMI Output to the Input on your HDMI Splitter (same with VGA)
  2. Connect the HDMI splitter outputs to the inputs on both monitors (same with VGA)

HDMI Splitter

Here is the same process with four monitors:

4 Port HDMI Splitter


Here are the recommended HDMI Splitters available:  4 Port HDMI Splitter

2 Port HDMI Splitter

4 Port HDMI Splitter

8 Port HDMI Splitter

 

Here are the recommended VGA Splitters available:

4 Port VGA Splitter

8 Port VGA Splitter

 

View all Splitters and Video Distirbutors HERE!

 

Of course, we are always happy to discuss your job requirements and offer any recommendations.

We Love to Talk to People about Security Cameras!

Toll-Free 877-880-7728

 

 

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SmartIR and How to Avoid Issues

At least a few times a week we get a call that normally goes like this:

Customer: I love the cameras in daytime, but at night I can’t see anything at all.

Tech Support: Are you able to send a screenshot for me to take a look at?

Customer: Sure. *Sends photo*

Tech Support: It looks like there’s a bit too much of the wall in your frame. I’d recommend moving the camera to the left just a bit to get rid of the reflection from the wall.

Customer calls the next day to tell me that just getting the wall or other reflective surface out of frame cleared up their issue. I should mention that these calls aren’t ever a bother. We completely understand that this isn’t something that the majority of people would even consider to be the cause of an issue.

A majority of newer CCTV cameras use Smart-IR, or some variant. Essentially it’s an adaptive IR that will adjust the focus of the IR to either foreground or overall image. If you have someone walking up to an older camera in IR mode, there was a chance that the image could be blown out from the over-saturation of light. Smart-IR solves this by adapting the intensity depending on what’s in the frame of the camera, and where it is.

In our first example we have a fairly balanced image. There are a few things in the foreground that are a bit more reflective, but it’s not disrupting the image too much.

 

In this next image, I’ve inserted a piece of paper into the frame. You can see that it’s beginning to affect the image, and the way the camera is picking it up.

 

Here I’ve placed the paper even further in frame, and now the entire background is pitch black. Granted, this is really a bit of a silly demonstration. So let’s go to something more practical.

 

Here we have a camera mounted in a pretty normal position. There’s a bit of the wall in the frame, but nothing that’s really causing the image to be affected. Let’s move the camera a bit to the right and see how the image changes. 

 

I do know that this is an extreme example, but this is exactly how reflective surfaces can affect your CCTV cameras in IR mode. Flooding the foreground with light, and basically removing the background.

As stated in a previous entry, it’s always good to plan your system layout before you start drilling and running cables. Consider where you’re mounting your cameras, and make sure that there aren’t going to be any obstacles you need to plan around. Gutters, soffits, light-colored walls, etc… If you have any of those in frame, adjust your camera and you’ll most likely be in good shape. If you’re still having issues, you’re always welcome to give us a call. If you’re in the market for some new security cameras with Smart-IR, we have a wide selection. Just let us know what your needs are.

We Love talking to People about Security Cameras.

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Ingress Protection or IP Ratings for Security Cameras

INGRESS PROTECTION

What are IP or Ingress Protection Ratings for Security Cameras?

IP ratings for security cameras (as well as many other electronics) are used to define levels of Ingress Protection, or the level of effectiveness against intrusion from foreign bodies such as dust, water, moisture, tools and hardware. These ratings are based on IEC standard 60529, also referred to as International Protection Marking (British BS EN 60529:1992, European IEC 60509:1989). The standard aims to provide users more detailed information than vague marketing terms such as ‘Waterproof’ or ‘Weatherproof’. This information is important when choosing a security camera for a specific application.

VTVV6TQConsidering environmental conditions and how they may affect the operation and longevity of a Security Camera can be an important part of planning any Security Camera installation. Although CCTV Cameras come in many form factors such as Bullet or Dome, etc. the protection ratings are meant to provide consistency over many variations. Both a Bullet camera and, for instance, a PTZ Camera can have the same IP Rating.NC312-MB

What do the numbers mean?

The numbers that follow IP each have a specific meaning. The first number indicates the degree of protection of a camera or enclosure from foreign bodies. The second defines the protection level that the camera from various forms of moisture (drips, sprays, submersion, etc.). We have included a chart below that explains the significance and variation of each number. Together, the numbers define the Ingress Protection Rating for that camera.

 

As an example, a CCTV Camera that has a rating of IP67 would be Dust Proof (6) and able to be submerged for short periods of time (7). Most outdoor rated Security Cameras will fall under the following three ratings: IP65, IP66 and IP67, respectively. It is important to note here, that although a Security Camera may be rated as weatherproof, the cable connections are generally NOT weatherproof. Several methods are available for making sure your CCTV connections are protected from weather including dielectric grease, junction boxes or gang boxes, or running the cable inside of the wall away from the elements. The best technology is even better when coupled with the best practices.

If you have any questions about your CCTV Project, we are always happy to help. It is our privilege to help you plan your installation, and help you get the most out of your Security Cameras. Just call us toll-free at 877-880-7728!

We Love to Talk to People about Security Cameras!

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How do I add Audio to my Security Camera System?

We are often asked “How do I add Audio to my Security Camera System?” Adding audio to an existing surveillance camera system involves  some basic requirements. Even if your system supports audio, that does not always mean that your cameras have built-in mic’s. Most Security Camera systems are set up in a similar way, and will require an additional Microphone Kit to achieve audio. If that is the case, you can basically follow the CCTV Microphone Installation Instructions below. Here we explain how to hook up a basic, stand alone, CCTV Microphone Kit to an HD Security System. In addition to hooking up the microphone, you must ensure that there is a way to hear the audio or play it back. In order to hear the audio, you must have a set of speakers for the DVR or your DVR or NVR must be connected to a monitor with built in speakers.

Also, before use, please refer to your state and local laws, and statutes, regarding audio surveillance, recording, and monitoring.

CCTV Microphone Installation

CCTV Microphone

Pictured above is our MICO-65KIT, Outdoor Surveillance Microphone Kit.

See all Security Microphone Kits Here!

Instructions:

1. Plug Red Power from Microphone into Male Power on Cable.

2. Plug White Audio Plug from Mic into Male Audio on Cable.

3. Plug Female Power on DVR side of cable into Power Adapter.

4. Plug Power Adapter into Power Source.

5. Plug Male Audio on cable into Audio Input (Or Audio In) on DVR.

6. BNC Plugs in this picture will not be used. Some Microphone kit cables come with audio and power only.

 

Other Requirements and Suggetions:

1. Security DVR or NVR must have an audio input.

2. If Audio is plugged into (Audio In) channel 1, DVR must be pulled up on channel 1 Full Screen Mode to hear live audio.

3. Your Monitor or TV must have built in speakers in order to hear live audio or playback directly from the DVR. If your monitor does not have speakers, you must have speakers connected to the audio output of your DVR, such as a DVR Speaker Kit

4. If you are using a VGA Monitor, you must run an audio cable from “Audio Out’ on your DVR to ‘Audio In’ on your Monitor. If using HDMI, audio will be transmitted through the HDMI cable and connection. (Your Monitor must still have built-in speakers)

5. Do not run audio cables next to high voltage or power wires, or install microphones near noisy appliances. Both will cause unwanted interference and noise.

Also see our Blog Post on CCTV Microphone uses and applications: CCTV Microphones

Surveillance Microphone

 

For additional technical assistance, call us toll-free at 877-880-7728!

We love to talk to people about Security Microphones!

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Audio Surveillance, CCTV Microphones, and Audio Monitoring with Security Systems

cctv microphone

Adding an Audio dimension to your security application can be a significant upgrade for a number of reasons. CCTV Microphones or Microphone Kits are popular in a variety of industries, and for a multitude of reasons. We have received multiple calls with both residential and commercial customers that ask “How can I add audio to my Security Camera System?” Most systems support audio surveillance in some capacity. However, it is necessary to take note of individual State and Local laws and statutes regarding audio surveillance and make sure you are in compliance before implementing your strategy.

Audio Surveillance is commonly used in retail and food service applications to promote, and monitor good customer service practices. Owners and Managers can monitor interactions between customers and employees to make sure the staff is providing courteous service as well as offering all the sale details, or pertinent information, etc. Recordings of these interactions are sometimes used as a training tool as well. Since many Security DVR’s and NVR’s will support audio over the web, Owners and Managers can monitor audio from other locations. This comes in handy when a business has multiple locations.

Body Worn Camera
Body Worn Camera

CCTV Audio is commonly used in Law Enforcement as well. In interview rooms as well as with Body Worn Cameras, Audio surveillance and recording can provide important evidence and documentation. Audio surveillance can also be used to pinpoint problem areas in active situations, especially over large areas such as college campuses or stadiums.

Stand Alone CCTV Microphone

 

CCTV Microphone kits, or Stand Alone Microphones, are generally ‘One Way’ Audio. In other words, you can hear and record what is being said from the location of the microphone. Many IP Cameras, however, have built-in, two-way audio. Two way audio allows for two way communication as the camera actually has a built in speaker as well. This can also be used for training or communicating in instances that need video support. It takes a little setting up for the talk back feature but can be very useful in the right application.

Microphone kits can be used indoors or outdoors as well. Outdoor applications require weather resistant microphones, or even weatherproof microphones, depending on the application. There are different issues that affect usage for indoor and/or outdoor audio. Since there is more ambient noise in outdoor applications, placement of the microphone becomes extremely important. Covering a large area may require several microphones. Background noise such as traffic sounds or wind blowing may affect audio quality. Similar issues may arise indoors if your application is in a busy, noisy restaurant for example. Familiarize yourself with the features and/or limitations of your Microphone and Equipment, as well as the environment it will be used in. Other issues to watch out for include installation issues including placement of cables. There are some guidelines to follow when installing Audio, or Microphone Kits and we have listed some of the main ones below.

Outdoor Microphone
Weatherproof Microphone: MICO-MIC

 

Here are some General Guidelines for Installing CCTV Microphones:

1. Never run your microphone cable next to, or across an electrical line. This will cause ‘noise’ in your line. Instead of hearing what you intended, you will hear static or just a loud hum. It’s not a pretty sound.

2. Do not install microphones next to noisy appliances. Due to proximity, you will hear unwanted noise in your feed. Even if you can’t hear the appliance very well, the microphone may pick up the noise enough to make important information hard to hear.

3. Do not install your microphone next to or too close to fluorescent lighting. This will also cause noise issues.

4. Installing a Microphone too close to a speaker may cause feedback issues (A loud pitched, gosh-awful, screeching noise).

5. Some applications require Stand-Alone Microphone Kits as opposed to Security Cameras with Built-In Mic’s. Placement of a Camera for optimal Video may not necessarily correspond to optimal placement for audio.

6. Make sure your Security DVR or NVR has the proper Audio Inputs before running your cables!

7. Consider the specifications and limitations of your equipment relative to the environment where they will be deployed.

And of course, if you need assistance, please feel free to call us for assistance. We love to talk to people about security cameras! And Microphones also!

View Audio Surveillance Equipment Here!

See Security Cameras with Built-In Audio Here!

 

Please also see our post, “How to install a CCTV Microphone to your Security Camera System”

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Specialty CCTV Cameras and their Applications

Specialty Security Cameras

There’s a gap in your coverage, and you’re not sure how to close it. The building you’re in is just a bit too far to get a clear image of the front of the parking lot from where you sit. You have a couple of choices at this point. You can just put up a normal camera and hope for the best, or you could get a variable focus camera, allowing you to get just that little bit closer and get the image you need. Understanding Specialty CCTV Cameras and Applications, and how to utilize them in your CCTV arsenal is one of the keys to a successful CCTV system. Let’s go over some of the more popular cameras and see what they have to offer.

 

1. The Variable Focus Camera (Vari-Focal)

PROS

  • Dome or Bullet Style Camera Options
  • Most widely available in 2.8 to 12mm focal lengths, so should fit most needs
  • Allows user to focus on what’s important in the image, and set themselves
  • Once the focal length is set, it’s set until the end of time. It’s not going anywhere.

CONS

  • Can be a little finicky when trying to set
  • May need a helper to get things focused properly, since it has to be done at the camera (Except for Motorized Zoom with UTC)

APPLICATIONS

  • Parking Lots
  • Gas Pumps
  • Cash Register Coverage
  • Long Driveways for Home Users
  • Anywhere that a tighter image is needed

STH-B3271W

There’s a reason I mentioned the Variable Focus or Vari-focal first. These are versatile cameras that will allow the end-user to get a nice, close image, without having to purchase an expensive box camera and lens. If you need to see an entry gate that is 70 feet away from the camera, the Vari-Focal Camera allows you to Zoom into that area and therefore use the highest resolution of the camera. With a standard fixed lens, your image may include the entry gate but also a significant area to the right and left of it. The gate will seem farther away and image quality of that area is greatly reduced. The Vari-Focal lens also gives the option to adjust the image if the user wants a wider angle in the future. Available in domes and bullets, they are easy to fit into any system configuration. You can also get a motorized zoom, Vari-focal camera, which cuts down on install time as they will auto focus the image for you. Just zoom in or out to the focal length you want and let it do it’s thing! The Camera will automatically get the perfectly focused image.

Mounting these cameras above or near a cash register is a really great way to keep track of employee movement when it comes to your business. With the current resolutions, you can even tell what denomination the bills are most of the time. Pictured is the STOIC, STH-B3271W Vari-Focal Bullet with 240 Feet of Night Vision. See it HERE!

Manual Vari-Focal Zoom Cameras

Motorized Zoom, Auto Focus Security Cameras

2. The Panoramic or Fisheye Camera

PROS

  • Large field of view
  • Available in indoor and outdoor versions
  • Monitor a whole room with a single camera
  • Great for large or small spaces
  • Many have software that allows for de-warping of the image
  • Some have two-way audio

CONS

  • If you’re looking for detail, this may fall short. Panoramic Security Cameras are really meant for a good overview rather than being a pin-point solution. That’s really the only con for these, though.

APPLICATIONS

  • Warehouses
  • Small or large stores
  • Parking lots
  • Storerooms

The Panoramic camera is relatively new in the CCTV industry. Being able to cover a large area with a single camera is great for people with a smaller budget but can be great in supplementing any existing system. In the case of a large warehouse, three of these cameras can cover the vast majority of the interior. Adding fixed cameras to that, you can have a 7 or 8 camera solution that will cover an entire warehouse efficiently and can save money in the process. These Cameras are also great for covering a four-way hallway. Mount the camera on the ceiling, in the center, and you can see in all four directions.

Image below was taken with the STH-D1390WP

See the New Version, STH-D1396WP here!

Panoramic CCTV

Covering a parking lot is similar. Mounted horizontally, the camera’s view is 180 degrees. This can easily cover 18 parking spots at a distance of only 30 feet, with just one camera. A single camera for overview supplemented with pin-point cameras would make for easy parking lot coverage. Not to mention inexpensive.

 

3. Starvis Low-Light Cameras

PROS

  • Ultra Low-Light images in color
  • Available in domes and bullets
  • Amazing for ambient lighting, like restaurants and bars.
  • Stays in color… it bears repeating

CONS

  • None, to be honest. Maybe I can come up with some nit-picky thing… Nope.

APPLICATIONS

  • Anywhere that needs a color picture with a low-light environment
  • Perfect for bars, cafes, restaurants, pool halls, etc…

We’ve done a previous post on the Starvis Back-Illuminated sensor and a few of the cameras that use them. It’s one of the few camera sensors that we always show off in our live demos. The difference in light sensitivity is pretty dramatic, which is why it’s always on our list. The applications for this one are pretty endless.

(Image on the left is without Starvis, on the right with Starvis. Two similar cameras side by side, same lighting conditions)

Starvis Cameras

It’s a great sensor to begin with, but adding the low-light ability just puts it on another level. Let’s say you run a bar or have a client with a dimly lit restaurant and you or your client would prefer not to have to look at a black and white image all the time. When there’s very little light and IR sensors come on, the image tends to get a bit blown out. It’s dark enough for the IR to kick on, but still too bright for the IR to really be effective. With a Starvis equipped security camera, you’ll get a great image without having it get blown out, and still be able to accurately describe an individual should the need arise.

View STARVIS Cameras HERE!

 

4. PTZ Cameras (Pan, Tilt, Zoom Cameras)

PROS

  • Be everywhere all the time. Okay, not really… but you do have complete control of the camera. Pan, tilt, and zoom from the DVR.
  • Programmable sentry mode means that you can set your own waypoints for the PTZ to track.
  • Available with motion tracking
  • Usually a minimum of 18x optical zoom available, some are up to 36x

CONS

  • These cameras can get relatively expensive. Some even like cheap, used car expensive. Most aren’t, however, and will pay for themselves in the right application.
  • They’re a bit large, so make sure that you’re okay with people being able to see them. (Generally not a problem with commercial applications).
  • Can be a huge “Hit Me First” sign for vandals. Not a great idea to mount a PTZ at ground level.

APPLICATIONS

  • Large areas that need wide, pin-point coverage.
  • Any application that demands on-the-fly control of a camera
  • Great for warehouses, malls, shopping centers, etc…
  • Usually for larger scale surveillance, but can be used for a home setting
  • Active surveillance such as panning and zooming in to a license plate, or face.

Best PTZ Cameras

Simply put, the PTZ camera is a wonderful option for any setting which needs a wide range of options, and needs it to be variable at a moment’s notice. Not only that, but playing around with these cameras is just cool. It’s amazing to just pan around and zoom in on things. Sounds kind of dorky, but it’s true. That aside, they’re wonderful for large-scale surveillance. Shopping centers, warehouses, large properties, even home applications. Keep in mind that while these cameras are coming down in price, the feature-heavy models are still quite expensive. The higher end models are up into the 4k (resolution, not price) range. They’re also starting to develop features like crowd recognition, facial recognition, abandoned bag detection, etc… these are features that are available now, but aren’t really quite there enough for the mass market. A good, entry level PTZ will start a just a few hundred dollars and go up from there.

View PTZ Cameras HERE!

 

There are other specialty security camera types that are not on this list, but these are the most common and useful that we’ve found. If you have any questions about these cameras, or have a question about your specific security application, please don’t hesitate to give us a call!

We love talking to people about security cameras!

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CCTV Data Recovery

CCTV Data Loss and Recovery

Anyone who has been around disk-based storage devices for a while has had an incident where they’ve either lost data, the HDD has been corrupted, or maybe the media has been damaged in some way. The immediate response is usually panic. “That data is lost forever, and I had important footage on there!”. Or, “My building has burnt down, and my DVR is toast. I’ll never be able to tell what happened!!”. To quote the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy:don't panic

There’s something to remember about data being erased from a hard drive, and that is that data isn’t really gone when you delete it. Not immediately, at least. Essentially (in very basic terms), the drive is told that the sectors that contained the data are okay to overwrite. So, if you’ve deleted data from your drive, or accidentally formatted it, the best thing to do is keep calm and don’t use that drive. Less time spent in use equals a better chance of recovery. That being said, if data is overwritten, it’s pretty much gone for good. Powering down the unit and calling a recovery specialist is the best first course of action. Also, keep in mind to try to act as quickly as possible, as CCTV hard drives are usually on a constant overwrite mode.

As it turns out, we specialize in CCTV data recovery, and we’re able to recover data from DVRs in most cases. We’ve been successful in recovering data from several DVR hard drives that were in fires, some with damage to the board, formatted drives, and corrupted files. If you ever find yourself in this situation, power down the DVR and give us a call. We’ll give you a quick and honest assessment. Our pricing is fair, and our turn-around times are usually within just a few days, unless there’s physical damage that needs to be repaired. We can help with damaged DVR’s, NVR’s, Hard Drives, SD Cards, IP Network Cameras and More! If you require CCTV data recovery, give us a call.

We love talking to people about data recovery.

877-880-7728

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Seeing Color in Extremely Low Light Levels with STARVIS!

Starvis Compare

Starvis CCTV Security Cameras

I’ve been in this industry for a while now, and there have been a handful of innovations that have really grabbed my attention. STARVIS, certainly is one of them. For quite some time, a major drawback to to having CCTV cameras in a low-lit area like a restaurant or bar, is that since the light levels are below the IR threshold, cameras stay in IR mode (Black and White) all the time. In IR mode (night vision), you sometimes lose detail that may be important later on, especially color. In a situation where we need detailed images from our CCTV Cameras, like what color shirt someone is wearing, having a Security Camera that can see in color in low light can be very beneficial. In addition, there are unforseen times when something may cause the IR to bounce wrong and ruin a picture. I know it sounds far fetched, but we don’t have CCTV systems because we’re complacent.

Like I had mentioned earlier, Starvis is one of the few new things in CCTV (well… relatively new) that has really grabbed my attention. It allows for very low-light footage to be captured in color. The Starvis Back-Illuminated sensor, made by SONY, is incredibly sensitive, and since its introduction, they’ve improved upon the technology. You may very well be asking yourself what practical application would this have for you. Check out this comparison below and pick which image you would rather use as evidence or as a way of determining what color shirt a person was wearing.

Starvis

With Starvis technology, not only are images captured, but the footage would also have extra information for the police to possibly make an arrest. Can’t see the color of a car when your cameras are in IR mode? What about a home intruder? The ability to be able to show the police exactly what they looked like is something that could be incredibly beneficial. Business owner? Maybe a restaurant or bar? Being able to keep all footage in color would help identify troublemakers should they start making a scene, or worse. Detail is better preserved in color. Beyond capturing detailed evidence, viewing your live CCTV images and recorded footage can be much more productive when in color. Imagine trying to explain to an employee in training: “Hey, when you served that woman with the, well I’m not sure what color hair she had but on my footage it looks…grayish?”

So Starvis Low Light CCTV Security Cameras are quickly becoming popular with Bar’s, Restaurants, Poker Rooms, Internet Cafe’s and a multitude of other business’s that operate in low light conditions. One Internet Cafe owner exclaimed “Wow, it’s great to be able to finally see everything in color, all the time! It always bothered me that when we were closed during the day, everything was in color but as soon as we opened, and the lights went down, my cameras were in black and white.”

Starvis

So you’re with me up to this point, right? I’m sure you’ve asked yourself, “Which cameras are offered by Ellipse Security that have Starvis Capabilities?”. I’m glad you asked. Our STOiC Technology Line of Cameras feature many Starvis Models for your needs. Here is a quick list:

The STH-B3271 with not only StarVis, but an incredible 270 feet of IR range

https://ellipsesecurity.com/product/sth-b3271b/

The STH-D5561W Dome

https://ellipsesecurity.com/product/sth-d5561w/

The variable focus STH-D2100W Indoor Dome (2.8-12mm zoom)

https://ellipsesecurity.com/product/sth-d2100w/

The STH-B3181 with an IR range of 180′ and a 2.8-12mm Variable Foucus lens (also available in charcoal color)

https://ellipsesecurity.com/product/sth-b3181w/

And the author’s personal favorite, the STH-B2061W. Quite possibly our most well rounded camera, as well as one of our most popular. SmartIR, Starvis, a compact size, and also has built in audio. This camera could have an article all on its own.

https://ellipsesecurity.com/product/sth-b2061w/

And adding new models every day!

So, now that you’ve seen what Starvis can do for you, and have some ideas as far as practical applications for the home and business, give it a shot for your CCTV camera system. You’ll be able to see the difference for yourself. Still have questions? No problem! Give us a call!

We love talking to people about security cameras, and StarVis!

Toll-Free 877-880-7728

 

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A Brief History of Samsung DIY Security camera Systems

Ellipse has been a stocking distributor for Samsung (now Wisenet) Home Security Priducts and DIY (do-it-yourself) security systems for over 14 years. Over this time, Samsung security camera systems have changed dramatically, as has the industry in general. A brief (very brief) history is in order to truly see how far we have come since the first Samsung, Black and White CCTV systems came out back in early 2002-03. Back in 2003, systems were bulkier, less robust, and only available in standard resolutions. In those days, VCRs were still common for CCTV storage, and the DIY security camera systems were called “Observation Systems”. If you wanted to record activity, you could add a VCR to your package (don’t forget the tapes!).

Among the very first Samsung DIY systems was the SSC-12. This 4-channel, black and white CRT monitor was a switching system, meaning you could only view one camera at a time. Recording followed suit on these systems, since VCRs were only single channel. This was eventually followed by the SOD14C4LN. Perhaps the most popular of the early DIY systems. Theese systems utilized an RJ11e type cable to transmit video, power, and 2-way audio over a single cable.

SOD-14C

The SOD14C4LN and SSC-17 were the first “Dual-Quad” systems available. And continued to use Samsung’s proprietary RJ11e cable. It was during the period that Ellipise Security came out with the first RJ11e to BNC adapter, so customers could add BNC Security Cameras to their RJ11e Systems as well as adapting their RJ11e cameras to BNC systems. From there, the systems evolved to employ web servers inside the monitors ,for viewing over the web. Systems such as the SSC-14WEB and SSC-17WEB allowed viewing over the Internet, but still required a VCR or single channel DVR in order to record.

With the introduction of the DVR (Digital Video Recorder), remote viewing moved from the monitor to the recording device. Early Samsung DVRs, such as the SHR-1014 were single channel and came with just a 60gig hard drive. Samsung DIY systems started to become “All-in-One”, with the DVR, web server, and power integrated into the monitor. The SMO210DN was an 8 channel CRT monitor with a built-in DVR. However, the monitor was extremely heavy (about 70lbs with a 21″ screen). Shipping these systems proved to be difficult, as they were oversized and very easily damaged.

Samsung took a giant leap forward with the SMT-190DN system. This system featured a 19″ LCD monitor with a built-in 8-channel DVR. It also included remote viewing and still utilized the RJ11 cable and cameras. Systems have also evolved from the first SSC12 and SOD14C cameras to more sophisticated SOC-C120 and SOC-N120, which incorporated night vision LEDs for the first time.

SOC-N120

The All-In-One trend continued with the introduction of the SME-2220, SME-4221, and SME-4220 systems. But Samsung began experimenting with new cabling options. These systems, along with the SDE-120N and SDE-300N, began using the 6-pin mini din cables for video and power. The SOC-A100 and SOC-A101 cameras used with the 6-pin mini din systems were higher resolution (600TVL), and better night vision. Although the All-In-One systems were popular, these would be the last of the models with the DVR built into the monitor.

Samsung’s next offering turned out to be a popular one. In addition to going to a stand-alone DVR and no monitor, Samsung chose to go ot RJ-45 or UTP cabling for their DIY systems. The SDE-4001 and SDE-5001 systems were 8 and 16 channel systems, respectively, and came with several variations of bullet style (SEB-1005) cameras and dome style cameras (SEB-1001). The DVRs were internet accessible and came with a 1TB hard drive. Although the system used RJ-45 cable, they remained analog systems. RJ-45 cable was easy to find, and the systems were popular since many homes and small businesses already had RJ-45 cabling in place. It was at this point that Ellipse Security began to sell the PTBNC-400 for adapting RJ-45 to BNC.

Eventually, however, Samsung decided to go to using common Coax cable (BNC). Systems like the SDS-P5100, SDS-P5122, and the SDS-P5102 were 16 channel systems that used BNC cable. The SDS-P4080 and SDS-P5080 were the 8 channel counterparts. Night vision capabilities and resolutions continued to improve, first with the SDC-5340BC, and then the SDC-7340BC security cameras. At this point, resolutions were up to 720TVL.

The next evolution in Samsung DIY followed the industry’s push into HD Analog technology. Beginning with the 720p SDH-C5100, and the SDH-B3300. The SDC-8440BC cameras included were capable of 720p HD resolution, and still used BNC cables. Shortly thereafter, the 1080p Full HD versions came out. The SDH-C75100 (16ch), SDH-C75080 (8ch), and SDH-C73000 (4ch) deployed the SDC-9441BC camera with 1080p resolution and 82ft of nightvision.

Samsung DIY Cables

Which brings us to the current offerings available to small businesses and homeowners today. 2MP systems, and brand new 4MP Super HD systems are cost effective and deliver HD resolution, siginificant night vision, and storage up to 2TB included. The SDH-C75083 is a 16 channel system that incorporates a metal-housed, SDC-9443BC camera with excellent night vision quality. Its 8 channel versions include the SDH-C74083HFN and the SDH-74043, which are expandable up to 8 cameras. The newest of the Samsung Wisenet systems are available in 1440p resolution (4MP). The 16 channel version, the SDH-C85100, comes with 10 of the new SDC-89440BC cameras. These cameras are IP66 rated, and boast 82ft of night vision. The 8 channel 4MP systems, the SDH-B84040 and SDH-B84080, comes with 4 and 8 cameras, respecitvely.

At Ellipse Security, we continue to stock and support all of the latest Samsung Wisenet security camera systems and accessories. As a Samsung authorized distributor for over 14 years, we have the most extensive knowledge base and support for Samsung DIY systems available. We continue to be a partner with Samsung, and a leader in the DIY CCTV market.

Questions? Want to know moew or have an older Samsung System that needs upgrading? Call us Toll-Free at 877-880-7728!

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