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What is an XVR?

NVR302-16Q

What is an XVR?

Well you have heard of DVRs and NVRs, but what is an XVR? Well, we would say that an XVR Recorder is basically a DVR on steroids (but in a good way). A DVR (Digital Video Recorder) is a device used for recording and processing HD Analog or SD Analog Security Cameras. Meanwhile, an NVR (Network Video Recorder) is the device used for IP Cameras. Enter the XVR, a device that is able to record and display both HD and IP Cameras for maximum scalability. While an NVR will still be the best choice for most applications using all IP Cameras, XVRs have taken HD recording into a new dimension. In addition, XVR Recorders like the Uniview NVR302-16Q, can support all common HD Video Formats including TVI, AHD, CVI and CVBS. Therefore the recorder is compatible with the vast majority of cameras regardless of manufacturer or format.

Hybrid DVR

Highest Compatibility Range

Supports TVI, AHD, CVI and CVBS Formats as well as IP Cameras.

 

What is the difference between an XVR and a DVR?

DVR Recorders are designed to process and record Analog Video Signals. They are used with Standard Definition or High Definition Security Cameras predominantly over Coax Cable or RG59. Some DVRs only support one format such as AHD or TVI. However, there are a number of ‘Hybrid’ DVR’s that can do multiple formats and accept a variety of Cameras using different signal formats at once. An XVR, on the other hand, takes that one step further. These Recorders will generally do all common HD over COAX formats, as well as supporing IP Cameras. This adds an interesting dimension to standard recorders and delivers an unmatched flexibility.

Example of XVR with 24 Channel Operation:

XVR

Is an XVR More Expensive?

Nope! The price is generally comparable to DVR pricing. Many major manufacturers have gone to producing either Hybrid DVRs or XVRs instead of standard DVRs and pricing has reflected this.

Why should I get an XVR?

Upgrading New Clients

If you are a Security Camera Installer and have a customer with legacy Analog or HD Analog Cameras, an XVR will provide more solution options without a customer having to replace existing equipment. Lets say that your customer has a 8 Channel DVR with (6) HD 1080P 2MP Cameras. For our example, lets assume that your customer wants higher resolution cameras or even wants to add IP Cameras. The need for higher resolution is obviously a common one. However, a potential client may also have a unique or specific need that only an IP Camera will provide. Of course, you could tell them to scrap their existing system, or try to install an NVR with expensive encoders, but that might be cost prohibitive. As an alternative, you could propose an XVR. This would allow using the customers (6) existing cameras as well as adding cameras of any format you choose. In addition you will be able to add several IP Cameras that solve your customers issue.

Bidding or Planning a Security Camera Application

Being more competitive when bidding a job, or being able to offer an alternative solution, is a good way to earn a clients trust. To take this one step further, installing an XVR will prevent you from being limited on camera options in the future. Whether you are installing the unit for a client, or you are an end user, you can rest assured that your system will be scalable for future expansion and variety of camera use.

If you are looking at upgrading your DVR or interested in a new Security Camera System, you should consider the following Video Recorders:

What XVR’s are available?

NVR302-16Q Uniview 16/24 Channel XVR

SAS-XVR51600 Stoic 16 Channel XVR

SAS-XVR5800 Stoic 8 Channel XVR

SAS-XVR5400 Stoic 4 Channel XVR

 

Also see our post on “How do I add IP Cameras to my DVR, XVR?”

 

Ellipse Security Distributors has been a supplier to the CCTV, Surveillance Industry since 2004.

Questions about your next Surveillance Project? Give us a call Toll-Free at 877-880-7728!

Ellipse Security

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IK10 Security Cameras – What is IK10?

IK10 Impact Ratings for Security Cameras

Have you been asked to find an IK10 Rated Security Camera for a project? If so, you may have wondered “What Exactly is IK10?” Since we carry several IK10 Security Cameras, we have been asked this question numerous times and decided to dedicate a post to briefly describing what the IK10 rating is, and what benefits there are to using Cameras with the this impact rating.

Impact Protection (IK) Rating: Degrees of protection provided by enclosures, for electrical equipment, against external mechanical impacts in accordance with IEC 62262:2002 and IEC 60068-2-75:1997.

Impact protection ratings can be extremely important when deciding which Security Camera models to deploy in a surveillance application. Not all environments are created equal, and of course, not all Security Cameras are created equal, especially in regards to Impact and Ingress Protection. In addition, you may also have a written spec for a job that requires meeting this standard. In this article, we will specifically discuss the Impact Protection standards, or IK Ratings, as they relate to Surveillance Cameras. If you would like to know about Ingress Protection, or IP Standards, you can read our other article here.

CCTV applications where Cameras are mounted in areas subject to vandalism and higher than normal abuse should look to higher standards of impact protection. Installing an expensive IP Camera that gets damaged by a rock or other projectile can be frustrating and costly for you and your client. Before offering a quote, look for an IK10 rated Camera, such as the IPC3238SR3-DVPZ from UNV. IK10 Rated IP Cameras can stand up against external abuse and vandalism better than your standard out door camera because IK10 is the Highest Standard of Impact protection available in Security Cameras.

What is IK10?

The Impact Rating of an electronic device is measured by Impact Energy or (Joules) it can absorb. Many of you may have heard of this term used for other devices as it is a relatively common term in some industries. Many products have ratings measured in Joules, which is essentially Energy Absorption/Dissipation. The number of Joules of Impact converts to a Standardized Terminology that becomes the IK Rating for a given device. For example, a device that can absorb 20 Joules Impact is rated IK10. This applies to Security Cameras as well. You may want to inspect the chart below for a clearer picture by comparison.

 

IK10 Chart

 

Here is some additional (More Technical) Information from Wikipedia:

[The European standard EN 62262 — the equivalent of international standard IEC 62262 (2002) — relates to IK ratings. This is an international numeric classification for the degrees of protection provided by enclosures for electrical equipment against external mechanical impacts. It provides a means of specifying the capacity of an enclosure to protect its contents from external impacts. The IK Code was originally defined in European Standard BS EN 50102 (1995, amended 1998). Following its adoption as an international standard in 2002, the European standard was renumbered EN 62262.

Before the advent of the IK code, a third numeral had been occasionally added to the closely related IP Code on ingress protection, to indicate the level of impact protection — e.g. IP66(9). Nonstandard use of this system, was one of the factors leading to the development of this standard. IK uses a separate two numeral code to distinguish it from the old differing systems. The standard came into effect in October 1995 and conflicting national standards had to be withdrawn by April 1997.

IK ratings help to classify products by its resistance to impacts by Kinetic Energy. In turn, EN 62262 specifies the way enclosures should be mounted when tests are carried out, the atmospheric conditions that should prevail, the number of impacts (5) and their (even) distribution, and the size, style, material, dimensions etc. of the various types of hammer designed to produce the energy levels required.] *1

 


Highest Impact Rating in Security Cameras

Currently (02-2020) IK10 is the Highest Rating Possible for protection against impact in electronic devices, such as Security Cameras. You can install CCTV Cameras that have the IK10 rating, can be used in applications with high rates of vandalism. In addition, a Security Camera that is IK10 rated will generally withstand a variety of elements better than standard Dome or Bullet Style Cameras. IK10 Cameras are built to last, so you can rest easy that you have chosen the best possible option for your CCTV application.

Ellipse Security offers several Uniview IP Camera models that are IK10 Rated for deployment in hostile environments. What’s even better? These IK10 Rated Cameras from UNV have the most extreme temperature range in the industry. Many of these models can withstand temperatures down to -40 degrees Farenheit. Yes, that’s 40 degrees below! And up to +158F. 

 

IK10 Vandal Proof

 

Uniview IK10 Security Camera Models:

IPC3238SR3-DVPZ 8MP IP Dome

IPC324ER3-DVPF28 4MP IP Dome

IPC8542ER5-DUG 4K Multi Sensor IP Camera

IPC324ER3-DVPF28

 

Have additional questions? Feel free to call us toll-free at 877-880-7728 or email [email protected]

We Love to Talk to People about Security Cameras!

 

Ellipse Security is an Authorized Uniview Distributor out of Jacksonville, Florida

 

*1 Wikipedia

 

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850nm vs. 940nm, IR Wavelength Comparison for CCTV Applications

There are two common IR wavelengths used in CCTV applications today. IR or Infrared wavelengths are measured in ‘nm’ or nanometers, which are used to specify the wavelength of electromagnetic radiation near the visible part of the light spectrum. Visible light ranges from about 390 to 700nm. The IR in CCTV applications take over from there, commonly 850nm and 940nm, which allow us to see images that would normally fall outside of our visible range, thus IR Illuminator. These IR LED’s are used to produce, or improve ‘Night Vision’ capabilities for security cameras.

visible-light-wavelength

 

Although the IR wavelengths 850nm and 940nm, respectively, are fairly similar in performance, there are a few important differences worth noting. The use of IR LED’s in security cameras has become commonplace as technology has improved dramatically and cost has come down. Generally, the great majority of security cameras or CCTV Cameras are sensitive to the 850nm wavelength. Although the IR light is invisible to the human eye, the IR LED’s will produce a faint red glow when looking directly at the camera or source.

The main advantage of the 940nm wavelength is that the IR LED’s do not produce any visible glow. In other words, they are completely invisible and can be used in applications that are required to be more covert. In fact, many people refer to them as ‘Covert IR’. This type of IR is also useful in places where a red glow may be mistaken as a signal and can not be used. The disadvantage of 940nm is that they are about 30-40% less effective and will illuminate less distance.LUMI-390

When using a separate, or stand-alone IR Illuminator such as the LUMI-240 IR Illuminator , it is important to make sure your CCTV camera is sensitive to the same wavelength as emitted by the illuminator. In other words, if the illuminator is 850nm, your security camera must be sensitive to that wavelength. Most cameras are sensitive to 850nm. Security Cameras that are 940nm are available as well, but much less common.

Most Security Cameras with built in IR LED’s, use an IR Cut Filter in order to maximize different lighting conditions during the day or night. During the daytime, the filter is on in order filter out Infrared Light, that way, color images are not distorted by IR Light. During the nighttime, the IR cut filter is automatically switched off to allow infrared light to enter the camera. The camera switches to IR Mode (Black and White) which is more sensitive to Infrared light.

IR technology has made great strides in recent years which is a great benefit to consumers and commercial CCTV users. SMART IR, Black Film Technology and STARVIS Sensors are among the exciting new Night Vision improvements in the surveillance industry. It is now possible to see extreme distances during day and night with high powered IR LED’s and IR Illuminators. If you are planning a CCTV Installation that requires night vision, it is certainly beneficial to understand the options that are available to you. At Ellipse Security, we are always ready to assist with your planning and design needs.

Have questions?

Call us Toll-Free at 877-880-7728

We Love to Talk to People about Security Cameras!

 

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How to hook up Multiple Monitors to your Security Camera System

A  facet of security camera system applications that we are asked about frequently is, “How Do I Hook Up Several Monitors to my Security Camera System?” Some Security DVRs have both a HDMI and a VGA output. A few of these can be used simultaneously, but most are designed to use one or the other. The former can be helpful if you have a HDMI monitor and a VGA Monitor but not if you want to hook up several of either. The most effective way to accomplish viewing on multiple monitors is by using a HDMI splitter or VGA splitter. Specifically, a splitter-amplifier which will guarantee full signal strength to multiple outputs. The correct splitter will be powered, rather than a stand alone splitter (non-powered) which is not effective.

The Benefits of Multiple Monitors for Security

Hooking up several monitors to your security camera system can be beneficial in a number of ways. It is possible to hook up 2, 4, 8, or more, monitors to simultaneously display your camera images. This allows monitoring in areas where there is no network connection or PC. In residential applications, for instance, you can check who is at the front door without leaving your bedroom or living room. In commercial applications, multiple monitors can be used to monitor the manufacturing process, freight and loading dock, sales floor, and any number of other applications.

With the right equipment, the process is easy and affordable. Since most new Security DVRs have an HDMI output, we will use HDMI as an example, but the process is similar with VGA or CVBS as well. Below you will find a series of diagrams that will outline the connection configurations for hooking up multiple monitors. We included the two, and four way below and hooking up eight monitors just repeats the process.

Here is a simple diagram to hook up two monitors:

  1. Connect the DVR’s HDMI Output to the Input on your HDMI Splitter (same with VGA)
  2. Connect the HDMI splitter outputs to the inputs on both monitors (same with VGA)

HDMI Splitter

Here is the same process with four monitors:

4 Port HDMI Splitter


Here are the recommended HDMI Splitters available:  4 Port HDMI Splitter

2 Port HDMI Splitter

4 Port HDMI Splitter

8 Port HDMI Splitter

 

Here are the recommended VGA Splitters available:

4 Port VGA Splitter

8 Port VGA Splitter

 

View all Splitters and Video Distirbutors HERE!

 

Of course, we are always happy to discuss your job requirements and offer any recommendations.

We Love to Talk to People about Security Cameras!

Toll-Free 877-880-7728