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Set Up QoS On your Uniview NVR

NVR302-16Q

How to set up QoS on your Uniview NVR

QoS (Quality of Service) is the ability to provide better service for specified network communication. As a network security mechanism, Quality of Service is used to address problems like network delay and blocking. When the network is overloaded or congested, it ensures that critical services are not delayed or discarded and that the network runs efficiently. Below we will demonstrate How to set up QoS on your Uniview NVR. 

Note: To use QoS, make sure that the switch support QoS mode.

1. Click Setup > Network > QoS.

 

2. Set a priority level (0~63) for each service. At present, QoS allows you to assign different priority to audio and video, alarm report, configuration management and FTP transmission. The greater the value, the higher the priority. For example, if the value of audio and video is set to 60, alarm report and configuration management is set to 0, and FTP is set to 4, when network congestion occurs, the priority is to ensure the smooth running of audio and video.

3. Click Save.

 

If you need further assistance, or have any questions about the process, feel free to give us a call!

Considering using Uniview on your next project? If so, Great Call! Call us toll-free at 877-880-7728 for Dealer Pricing and System Design.

 

Ellipse Security

A Uniview Authorized Distributor

Uniview

Uniview Quick Links:

Uniview IP Solutions

Uniview IP Cameras

 

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Uniview is a leading manufacturer of IP Security Cameras and NVRs with advanced, user friendly features. The company has developed a number of progressive technologies including Ultra265, and Long Range PoE transmission. If you are looking for an IP Surveillance Solution for Small or Large Business, then UNV has got you covered!

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List of Compatible SD Cards for Uniview IP Cameras

Compatible SD Cards for Uniview IP Cameras

SD Cards for Uniview: Uniview produces a number of IP Cameras with a built in MicroSD Card Slot for on board recording. You may have also heard of the term ‘Edge’ Recording, which allows an IP Camera to record to a MicroSD Card for redundancy. Using this feature can add an extra layer of security for your stored images if you ever lose network connection. Because you can record on the camera itself, it is also possible to use (1) IP Camera as a stand alone system, without the need for an NVR.

Most Uniview IP Cameras with MicroSD Card slot now support up to 256GB. The 256GB Models have not been added to the list yet. However, the brands listed below should all be supported up to 256GB. Feel free to call us if you have any questions about SD Cards for Uniview Cameras.

When selecting an SD card for your IP camera, it’s important to make sure that it’s going to be compatible with your device. Below is a short list of SD cards that will be 100% compatible with your new Uniview IP Camera.

 

Kingston 32G/C10/UHS-1(90MB/s)
Kingston 64G/C10/UHS-1(90MB/s)
Kingston 128G/C10/UFS-1(80MB/s)

Transcend 32G/C10/UHS-I
Transcend 64G/C10/UHS-I

SanDisk 32G/C10/UHS-1?90MB/s?
SanDisk 64G/C10/UHS-1?80MB/s?
SanDisk 128G/C10/UHS-1?80MB/s?

Samsung 32G
Samsung 64G
Samsung 128G

TOSHIBA 32G/C10/UHS-1(90MB/s)
TOSHIBA 64G/C10/UHS-1(90MB/s)
TOSHIBA 128G/C10/UHS-1(90MB/s)

UNV 8G
UNV 16G
UNV 32G
UNV 64G
UNV 128G

 

NOTE: Additionally, most of the above brands have 256GB MicroSD Cards that are compatible with Uniview IP Cameras.

 

Ellipse Security

 

   

 

Authorized Uniview Distributor

If you have any questions about these SD cards, feel free to give us a call at 877-880-7728.

If you are considering using Uniview for an upcoming project, please feel free to call us for design assistance or with camera questions.

 

Quick Links:

Uniview IP Solutions

Uniview NVR

 

Uniview IP Solutions PoE

Do you install IP Camera Systems or CCTV? Sign up for discounted pricing and more by becoming a Dealer!

Become an Ellipse Security Dealer!

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How to Upgrade Uniview Devices

How to Upgrade Uniview NVR and IP Cameras

We are frequently asked “How do I upgrade my Uniview NVR” (or IP Camera). With Uniview Devices, the process is relatively simple and straight forward. If you are ready to upgrade one of your IP Cameras or a Uniview NVR, you can follow the steps below, or just give us a call! We love to talk to people about Uniview!

 

Notes on How to Upgrade Uniview Devices:

  • Make sure you use the correct upgrade file for you device. The upgrade file is a ZIP file and must include all the necessary files. Otherwise, unexpected results may occur.
  • Make sure power is not interrupted during upgrade. A power failure during system upgrade may cause startup failure. Use an Uninterrupted Power Supply (UPS) if necessary. The device will restart after the upgrade is completed.
  • When upgrade the IPC, the upgrade boot program function is disabled by default, and only the camera will be upgraded to the latest version. If enabled, both the camera and the boot program will be upgraded.

How to Upgrade Uniview IP Cameras

1. Click: Setup > System > Maintenance.

2. Under Software Upgrade, click Browse and select the correct upgrade file.

3. Click Upgrade and then confirm to start. The camera will restart automatically after the upgrade is completed. Some devices support boot program upgrade. To upgrade, select Upgrade Boot Program.

4. You may click Detect to check for new versions available to cloud upgrade.

 

How to Upgrade your Uniview NVR

Upgrade the NVR under Maintain > Upgrade locally (using an upgrade file saved in a USB storage device) or by cloud (through a cloud server).

To upgrade by cloud, ensure that the NVR is connected to a fully functional DNS server (configured under System > Network > Basic), and click Check to see whether a newer version is available. The time that a cloud upgrade takes is affected by network connection status.

 

 

Ellipse Security

If you have any questions about this process, feel free to give us a call at 877-880-7728.

To find out what Uniview can do for your next project, please look over our current offerings here:

Uniview IP Solutions

Uniview NVR

 

Uniview IP Solutions PoE

 

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Backing Up Recordings and Images with Uniview NVR

How Do You Backup Recordings & Images with a Uniview NVR?

Backup Recordings with Uniview NVR

Note: This function, management page may vary with models. Please see actual Web interface for details.

 

Recording Backup

Backup, also known as recording backup, is the process of querying video stored on a hard disk of the NVR and then saving to a USB storage device or a DVD-R disc as a file. In this article, we will cover How to Backup Recordings with Uniview NVR.

 

Recording backup has the following conditions:

  • Back up using a USB storage device: format the partition in FAT32 or NTFS format; connect the storage device correctly to the NVR.
  • Back up using a disc: use a GP65NB60 DVD burner. Make sure the DVD-R disc is empty, and the burner is correctly connected to the NVR. Permission is required.

The recording to back up is stored on a hard disk of the NVR.

Note: The default file format is .mp4 when you back up recordings to a USB storage device.

Note: When backing up using a disc, recordings are saved as .TS files only.

 

Normal Backup

1. Click Backup > Recording. All cameras are selected by default.

2. Set search conditions and then click Search. Search results are displayed.

Note: You can lock/unlock and play recording files in this window.

3. Select the desired recording(s) and then click Backup.

4. Select a partition.

 

Back up to USB storage device

Set the destination in the USB storage device and then click Backup. The recording(s) will be saved to the specified directory.

Note: You may want to create a new folder for the recording(s) by clicking New Folder.

Note: If the connected storage device has a capacity that is greater than 2T, clicking Format will format the device to NTFS file system; if the capacity is 2T or less, the device will be formatted to

FAT32 or NTFS. Only certain devices can format a storage device that has a greater capacity than 2T.

Note: A progress bar (e.g., Exporting X/Y) is displayed to indicate the progress, where X indicates the current number being backed up, and Y indicates the total number of recordings. To cancel

the operation, click Cancel.

Note: A backup file is named in this format: camera name-recording start time file extension. For example, Ch9-20150630183546.mp4.

 

 

Back up to a DVD-R disc

Set the destination and then click Backup. The recording(s) will be saved to the specified directory.

Note: Before you start burning, check that the video to back up was not compressed using U-Code.

Note: Clicking Cancel before burning is finished will cause the disc unusable.

Note: When burning is finished, wait for the drive to eject itself. Do not eject the drive manually.

Note: The NVR does not support playback of recordings saved on a disc.

 

 

Video Clip Backup

A recording can be clipped and saved to a USB storage device.

1. Open the playback window.

  1. After playback starts, click on the playback toolbar to clip videos.
  2. Click   and then click 

4. Select the desired video clip(s) and then click Backup.

5. Select a destination in the USB storage device and then click Backup. The selected video clips are saved to the specified directory.

 

 

Image Backup

The default format of image backup is JPG.

1. Click Backup > Image.

2. Set search conditions and then click Search. Search results are displayed.

Note: The image resolution depends on the resolution from the output interface and the number

of windows displayed when the snapshot is taken.

3. Select the desired file(s) and then click Backup.

4. Select a destination in the USB storage device and then click Backup. The selected files are

saved to the specified directory.

 

Ellipse Security

If you have any questions about this process, feel free to give us a call at 877-880-7728.

To find out what Uniview can do for your next project, please look over our current offerings here:

Uniview IP Solutions

Uniview NVR

 

Uniview IP Solutions PoE

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H.264 vs. H.265 Testing and Recommendation

Practical Test of H.264 vs H.265

In Relation to CCTV

So H.264 vs H.265. We’ve been hearing a lot about H.265 compression and how it’s better than H.264. Well… how do you quantify ‘better’? Seeing hypothetical numbers on paper is one thing but seeing it in a real-world application is quite another. We decided to see exactly what kind of gain we would get in compression on a 4K system.

Our test system is a TruView 4K 4ch NVR (THK-NR32P4-4) with a 1TB Western Digital WD10PURX (Purple). Our camera is the TruView 4K NC-328-XB.

We’re keeping everything fairly stock, but we’re bumping up the recording quality to ‘Highest’ and maxing out the frame rate. Essentially, we want to make sure that there’s a good amount of drive space being taken up. The picture above is for the first 24 hours on H.264.

We formatted the hard drive and began the test at 4:15PM. Again, this will run for a full 24-hour period, and we’ll record how much drive space was taken up. Then we’ll run the same test with H.265 compression and see how it differs.

You may be wondering what exactly H.264 and H.265 are.

 

From Wikipedia:

“H.264 or MPEG-4 Part 10, Advanced Video Coding is a block-oriented motion-compensation-based video compression standard. As of 2014 it is one of the most commonly used formats for the recording, compression, and distribution of video content. It supports resolutions up to 8192×4320, including 8K UHD. (H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, n.d.)”

H.265 takes this a step further.

So, what does that mean exactly? In the most oversimplified way that I can think to put it, it’s an encoding method that allows video to look great while not taking up as much storage space. Older encoding methods, for example MPEG-2, take up quite a bit more storage space than MPEG-4. With the introduction of H.265 to the CCTV world, it could mean much more efficient hard drive use. Especially for those who need a couple of weeks of video on hand. Or for those who need to store video for even longer periods of time. Some industries require a month or more for storage. This becomes even more significant in larger installs with 30 or more cameras.

We completed our first 24 hours and here are the results:

Start Time: 4:15PM 6/4/18

NVR: THK-N32P4-4

HDD: WDPURX10

Camera: NC328-XB @8MP 4K 3840×2160

Duration: 24 Hours Continuous Recording

Starting Drive Space: 931GB

Ending Drive Space:  827GB

Space Used: 104GB

Exported Video Size: 1GB (14min 11sec)

 

Now that we have our first day finished, let’s switch over to H.265, format the HDD, and begin the wait. The only thing we’re changing here is H.264 to H.265.

 

While we’re waiting on the H.265 video to finish up, let’s check the video quality of the previous recording.

In my opinion, the video looks good. Pretty much as expected for this camera and this compression.

You can even make out the small lettering in my tattoo.

 

Let’s see how the H.265 turns out.

Start Time: 4:27PM 6/5/18

NVR: THK-N32P4-4

HDD: WDPURX10

Camera: NC328-XB @8MP 4K 3840×2160

Duration: 24 Hours Continuous Recording

Starting Drive Space: 929GB

Ending Drive Space:  904GB

Space Used: 25GB

We wanted to see what kind of HDD use we would get over the weekend, so we left the camera running. From 6/7/18 @ 3:10PM to 6/11/18 @ 9:30AM, the drive only used a further 44GBs of storage space. So in total, less than 70GB of storage for about three and a half days. 34GBs less than H.264 took up within 24 hours. It should be mentioned at this point that both sets of data were gathered in a room with very little motion.

This space savings does come at a bit of a cost, though.

The processing power needed to achieve this level of compression is fairly high. Quality doesn’t suffer as much as you may think, but there is a difference. Here’s how I’d personally break this down, at least until the processing concerns are settled.

Hypothetical system:

32ch NVR

3x 8TB HDDs (24TB Total)

32 8MP IP Cams

5 of those cameras are in important areas that need to be recording 24hrs a day. We’ll call this Group A.

27 are for overview or in areas that aren’t going to be occupied at night or on weekends.  This will be Group B.

My recommended set up would be to keep Group A on 24 hour recording on H.265, and keep Group B on motion recording with H.264. This would allow coverage where it’s needed and conserve HDD space. It would also conserve CPU usage. Like I said earlier, some people may not be as concerned with disk space, but there are situations where it’s a necessity.

In the end, we recommend it if you need the storage space and if you have the resources to utilize H.265.

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SmartIR and How to Avoid Issues

At least a few times a week we get a call that normally goes like this:

Customer: I love the cameras in daytime, but at night I can’t see anything at all.

Tech Support: Are you able to send a screenshot for me to take a look at?

Customer: Sure. *Sends photo*

Tech Support: It looks like there’s a bit too much of the wall in your frame. I’d recommend moving the camera to the left just a bit to get rid of the reflection from the wall.

Customer calls the next day to tell me that just getting the wall or other reflective surface out of frame cleared up their issue. I should mention that these calls aren’t ever a bother. We completely understand that this isn’t something that the majority of people would even consider to be the cause of an issue.

A majority of newer CCTV cameras use Smart-IR, or some variant. Essentially it’s an adaptive IR that will adjust the focus of the IR to either foreground or overall image. If you have someone walking up to an older camera in IR mode, there was a chance that the image could be blown out from the over-saturation of light. Smart-IR solves this by adapting the intensity depending on what’s in the frame of the camera, and where it is.

In our first example we have a fairly balanced image. There are a few things in the foreground that are a bit more reflective, but it’s not disrupting the image too much.

 

In this next image, I’ve inserted a piece of paper into the frame. You can see that it’s beginning to affect the image, and the way the camera is picking it up.

 

Here I’ve placed the paper even further in frame, and now the entire background is pitch black. Granted, this is really a bit of a silly demonstration. So let’s go to something more practical.

 

Here we have a camera mounted in a pretty normal position. There’s a bit of the wall in the frame, but nothing that’s really causing the image to be affected. Let’s move the camera a bit to the right and see how the image changes. 

 

I do know that this is an extreme example, but this is exactly how reflective surfaces can affect your CCTV cameras in IR mode. Flooding the foreground with light, and basically removing the background.

As stated in a previous entry, it’s always good to plan your system layout before you start drilling and running cables. Consider where you’re mounting your cameras, and make sure that there aren’t going to be any obstacles you need to plan around. Gutters, soffits, light-colored walls, etc… If you have any of those in frame, adjust your camera and you’ll most likely be in good shape. If you’re still having issues, you’re always welcome to give us a call. If you’re in the market for some new security cameras with Smart-IR, we have a wide selection. Just let us know what your needs are.

We Love talking to People about Security Cameras.

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Specialty CCTV Cameras and their Applications

Specialty Security Cameras

There’s a gap in your coverage, and you’re not sure how to close it. The building you’re in is just a bit too far to get a clear image of the front of the parking lot from where you sit. You have a couple of choices at this point. You can just put up a normal camera and hope for the best, or you could get a variable focus camera, allowing you to get just that little bit closer and get the image you need. Understanding Specialty CCTV Cameras and Applications, and how to utilize them in your CCTV arsenal is one of the keys to a successful CCTV system. Let’s go over some of the more popular cameras and see what they have to offer.

 

1. The Variable Focus Camera (Vari-Focal)

PROS

  • Dome or Bullet Style Camera Options
  • Most widely available in 2.8 to 12mm focal lengths, so should fit most needs
  • Allows user to focus on what’s important in the image, and set themselves
  • Once the focal length is set, it’s set until the end of time. It’s not going anywhere.

CONS

  • Can be a little finicky when trying to set
  • May need a helper to get things focused properly, since it has to be done at the camera (Except for Motorized Zoom with UTC)

APPLICATIONS

  • Parking Lots
  • Gas Pumps
  • Cash Register Coverage
  • Long Driveways for Home Users
  • Anywhere that a tighter image is needed

STH-B3271W

There’s a reason I mentioned the Variable Focus or Vari-focal first. These are versatile cameras that will allow the end-user to get a nice, close image, without having to purchase an expensive box camera and lens. If you need to see an entry gate that is 70 feet away from the camera, the Vari-Focal Camera allows you to Zoom into that area and therefore use the highest resolution of the camera. With a standard fixed lens, your image may include the entry gate but also a significant area to the right and left of it. The gate will seem farther away and image quality of that area is greatly reduced. The Vari-Focal lens also gives the option to adjust the image if the user wants a wider angle in the future. Available in domes and bullets, they are easy to fit into any system configuration. You can also get a motorized zoom, Vari-focal camera, which cuts down on install time as they will auto focus the image for you. Just zoom in or out to the focal length you want and let it do it’s thing! The Camera will automatically get the perfectly focused image.

Mounting these cameras above or near a cash register is a really great way to keep track of employee movement when it comes to your business. With the current resolutions, you can even tell what denomination the bills are most of the time. Pictured is the STOIC, STH-B3271W Vari-Focal Bullet with 240 Feet of Night Vision. See it HERE!

Manual Vari-Focal Zoom Cameras

Motorized Zoom, Auto Focus Security Cameras

2. The Panoramic or Fisheye Camera

PROS

  • Large field of view
  • Available in indoor and outdoor versions
  • Monitor a whole room with a single camera
  • Great for large or small spaces
  • Many have software that allows for de-warping of the image
  • Some have two-way audio

CONS

  • If you’re looking for detail, this may fall short. Panoramic Security Cameras are really meant for a good overview rather than being a pin-point solution. That’s really the only con for these, though.

APPLICATIONS

  • Warehouses
  • Small or large stores
  • Parking lots
  • Storerooms

The Panoramic camera is relatively new in the CCTV industry. Being able to cover a large area with a single camera is great for people with a smaller budget but can be great in supplementing any existing system. In the case of a large warehouse, three of these cameras can cover the vast majority of the interior. Adding fixed cameras to that, you can have a 7 or 8 camera solution that will cover an entire warehouse efficiently and can save money in the process. These Cameras are also great for covering a four-way hallway. Mount the camera on the ceiling, in the center, and you can see in all four directions.

Image below was taken with the STH-D1390WP

See the New Version, STH-D1396WP here!

Panoramic CCTV

Covering a parking lot is similar. Mounted horizontally, the camera’s view is 180 degrees. This can easily cover 18 parking spots at a distance of only 30 feet, with just one camera. A single camera for overview supplemented with pin-point cameras would make for easy parking lot coverage. Not to mention inexpensive.

 

3. Starvis Low-Light Cameras

PROS

  • Ultra Low-Light images in color
  • Available in domes and bullets
  • Amazing for ambient lighting, like restaurants and bars.
  • Stays in color… it bears repeating

CONS

  • None, to be honest. Maybe I can come up with some nit-picky thing… Nope.

APPLICATIONS

  • Anywhere that needs a color picture with a low-light environment
  • Perfect for bars, cafes, restaurants, pool halls, etc…

We’ve done a previous post on the Starvis Back-Illuminated sensor and a few of the cameras that use them. It’s one of the few camera sensors that we always show off in our live demos. The difference in light sensitivity is pretty dramatic, which is why it’s always on our list. The applications for this one are pretty endless.

(Image on the left is without Starvis, on the right with Starvis. Two similar cameras side by side, same lighting conditions)

Starvis Cameras

It’s a great sensor to begin with, but adding the low-light ability just puts it on another level. Let’s say you run a bar or have a client with a dimly lit restaurant and you or your client would prefer not to have to look at a black and white image all the time. When there’s very little light and IR sensors come on, the image tends to get a bit blown out. It’s dark enough for the IR to kick on, but still too bright for the IR to really be effective. With a Starvis equipped security camera, you’ll get a great image without having it get blown out, and still be able to accurately describe an individual should the need arise.

View STARVIS Cameras HERE!

 

4. PTZ Cameras (Pan, Tilt, Zoom Cameras)

PROS

  • Be everywhere all the time. Okay, not really… but you do have complete control of the camera. Pan, tilt, and zoom from the DVR.
  • Programmable sentry mode means that you can set your own waypoints for the PTZ to track.
  • Available with motion tracking
  • Usually a minimum of 18x optical zoom available, some are up to 36x

CONS

  • These cameras can get relatively expensive. Some even like cheap, used car expensive. Most aren’t, however, and will pay for themselves in the right application.
  • They’re a bit large, so make sure that you’re okay with people being able to see them. (Generally not a problem with commercial applications).
  • Can be a huge “Hit Me First” sign for vandals. Not a great idea to mount a PTZ at ground level.

APPLICATIONS

  • Large areas that need wide, pin-point coverage.
  • Any application that demands on-the-fly control of a camera
  • Great for warehouses, malls, shopping centers, etc…
  • Usually for larger scale surveillance, but can be used for a home setting
  • Active surveillance such as panning and zooming in to a license plate, or face.

Best PTZ Cameras

Simply put, the PTZ camera is a wonderful option for any setting which needs a wide range of options, and needs it to be variable at a moment’s notice. Not only that, but playing around with these cameras is just cool. It’s amazing to just pan around and zoom in on things. Sounds kind of dorky, but it’s true. That aside, they’re wonderful for large-scale surveillance. Shopping centers, warehouses, large properties, even home applications. Keep in mind that while these cameras are coming down in price, the feature-heavy models are still quite expensive. The higher end models are up into the 4k (resolution, not price) range. They’re also starting to develop features like crowd recognition, facial recognition, abandoned bag detection, etc… these are features that are available now, but aren’t really quite there enough for the mass market. A good, entry level PTZ will start a just a few hundred dollars and go up from there.

View PTZ Cameras HERE!

 

There are other specialty security camera types that are not on this list, but these are the most common and useful that we’ve found. If you have any questions about these cameras, or have a question about your specific security application, please don’t hesitate to give us a call!

We love talking to people about security cameras!

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CCTV Data Recovery

CCTV Data Loss and Recovery

Anyone who has been around disk-based storage devices for a while has had an incident where they’ve either lost data, the HDD has been corrupted, or maybe the media has been damaged in some way. The immediate response is usually panic. “That data is lost forever, and I had important footage on there!”. Or, “My building has burnt down, and my DVR is toast. I’ll never be able to tell what happened!!”. To quote the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy:don't panic

There’s something to remember about data being erased from a hard drive, and that is that data isn’t really gone when you delete it. Not immediately, at least. Essentially (in very basic terms), the drive is told that the sectors that contained the data are okay to overwrite. So, if you’ve deleted data from your drive, or accidentally formatted it, the best thing to do is keep calm and don’t use that drive. Less time spent in use equals a better chance of recovery. That being said, if data is overwritten, it’s pretty much gone for good. Powering down the unit and calling a recovery specialist is the best first course of action. Also, keep in mind to try to act as quickly as possible, as CCTV hard drives are usually on a constant overwrite mode.

As it turns out, we specialize in CCTV data recovery, and we’re able to recover data from DVRs in most cases. We’ve been successful in recovering data from several DVR hard drives that were in fires, some with damage to the board, formatted drives, and corrupted files. If you ever find yourself in this situation, power down the DVR and give us a call. We’ll give you a quick and honest assessment. Our pricing is fair, and our turn-around times are usually within just a few days, unless there’s physical damage that needs to be repaired. We can help with damaged DVR’s, NVR’s, Hard Drives, SD Cards, IP Network Cameras and More! If you require CCTV data recovery, give us a call.

We love talking to people about data recovery.

877-880-7728

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Seeing Color in Extremely Low Light Levels with STARVIS!

Starvis Compare

Starvis CCTV Security Cameras

I’ve been in this industry for a while now, and there have been a handful of innovations that have really grabbed my attention. STARVIS, certainly is one of them. For quite some time, a major drawback to to having CCTV cameras in a low-lit area like a restaurant or bar, is that since the light levels are below the IR threshold, cameras stay in IR mode (Black and White) all the time. In IR mode (night vision), you sometimes lose detail that may be important later on, especially color. In a situation where we need detailed images from our CCTV Cameras, like what color shirt someone is wearing, having a Security Camera that can see in color in low light can be very beneficial. In addition, there are unforseen times when something may cause the IR to bounce wrong and ruin a picture. I know it sounds far fetched, but we don’t have CCTV systems because we’re complacent.

Like I had mentioned earlier, Starvis is one of the few new things in CCTV (well… relatively new) that has really grabbed my attention. It allows for very low-light footage to be captured in color. The Starvis Back-Illuminated sensor, made by SONY, is incredibly sensitive, and since its introduction, they’ve improved upon the technology. You may very well be asking yourself what practical application would this have for you. Check out this comparison below and pick which image you would rather use as evidence or as a way of determining what color shirt a person was wearing.

Starvis

With Starvis technology, not only are images captured, but the footage would also have extra information for the police to possibly make an arrest. Can’t see the color of a car when your cameras are in IR mode? What about a home intruder? The ability to be able to show the police exactly what they looked like is something that could be incredibly beneficial. Business owner? Maybe a restaurant or bar? Being able to keep all footage in color would help identify troublemakers should they start making a scene, or worse. Detail is better preserved in color. Beyond capturing detailed evidence, viewing your live CCTV images and recorded footage can be much more productive when in color. Imagine trying to explain to an employee in training: “Hey, when you served that woman with the, well I’m not sure what color hair she had but on my footage it looks…grayish?”

So Starvis Low Light CCTV Security Cameras are quickly becoming popular with Bar’s, Restaurants, Poker Rooms, Internet Cafe’s and a multitude of other business’s that operate in low light conditions. One Internet Cafe owner exclaimed “Wow, it’s great to be able to finally see everything in color, all the time! It always bothered me that when we were closed during the day, everything was in color but as soon as we opened, and the lights went down, my cameras were in black and white.”

Starvis

So you’re with me up to this point, right? I’m sure you’ve asked yourself, “Which cameras are offered by Ellipse Security that have Starvis Capabilities?”. I’m glad you asked. Our STOiC Technology Line of Cameras feature many Starvis Models for your needs. Here is a quick list:

The STH-B3271 with not only StarVis, but an incredible 270 feet of IR range

https://ellipsesecurity.com/product/sth-b3271b/

The STH-D5561W Dome

https://ellipsesecurity.com/product/sth-d5561w/

The variable focus STH-D2100W Indoor Dome (2.8-12mm zoom)

https://ellipsesecurity.com/product/sth-d2100w/

The STH-B3181 with an IR range of 180′ and a 2.8-12mm Variable Foucus lens (also available in charcoal color)

https://ellipsesecurity.com/product/sth-b3181w/

And the author’s personal favorite, the STH-B2061W. Quite possibly our most well rounded camera, as well as one of our most popular. SmartIR, Starvis, a compact size, and also has built in audio. This camera could have an article all on its own.

https://ellipsesecurity.com/product/sth-b2061w/

And adding new models every day!

So, now that you’ve seen what Starvis can do for you, and have some ideas as far as practical applications for the home and business, give it a shot for your CCTV camera system. You’ll be able to see the difference for yourself. Still have questions? No problem! Give us a call!

We love talking to people about security cameras, and StarVis!

Toll-Free 877-880-7728

 

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Getting the Most out of Your DIY CCTV System

 

Many of us have had that feeling. Getting a new CCTV system home, getting everything unpacked, going over the setup instructions, running cable… you get the idea. You get everything installed, get your security cameras set just right, and then you go to look at what you’ve accomplished. It looks stunning. And why wouldn’t it? You’ve worked so hard. You’ve taken every aspect into consideration. Fabulous.

But you’ve now asked your significant other to go walk around outside, so you can see some movement on your system. That’s half the fun, right? They go off on their walk and… you can’t see them for several minutes. What? Oh, there they are. Now they’re gone again…. No matter, though. Right? At least you’ve got all the entrances covered. Other than the side door they’ve just come in through. No matter. It’s okay.

That night, you take what seems like the 50th look at your gorgeous CCTV system, but this time… something’s wrong. These cameras are supposed to be great at night! WHAT GIVES?! You paid a lot of money for this security system, and it took just about all weekend (with help, by the way) to get the thing installed. Now you have four out of ten security cameras that look horrible at night. Why on earth are they so blown out and gross looking?

How frustrating.

Here’s the thing. Many people who are doing they installs on their own don’t have a good plan going into it. Here are a few tips for you to keep in mind if you decide to forgo having someone install your system for you.

  1. Have a layout plan before you start running cables. Even before you start looking at CCTV systems, you should have a good plan as far as your surveillance layout. You need to know which areas of your property you want to cover, which are key areas, and also have a good idea of how to accomplish your goal. Why plan this before you look for systems? Well, maybe you have a need for more than just a box system. One instance that we’ve seen first-hand here at Ellipse Security is a client needed to keep a close eye on a dock that was about 100 yards from their house. A fixed camera wasn’t going to do this for them, so they needed a variable focus camera for this task. The same client had a need for longer range IR than normal kit cameras could provide. A STOiC variable focus camera, and a few long-range IR cameras came to the rescue. Added to their kit cameras, they made this system something that was perfect for their needs.
  2. Honestly assess your needs. I really don’t know anyone who doesn’t want a fleet of PTZ cameras. Who doesn’t want to feel like they’re one of those guys who gets to play around with the surveillance system for the city of London? This author can sincerely tell you that he would love to. That being said, not only would this be overkill for the majority of smaller systems, but having that many PTZ cameras is pretty cost prohibitive for most of us. There’s also the flip side of that coin. Everyone wants a deal. Again, we’re all in good company here. But the rock-bottom kit system may not be what your situation needs. We’re not saying that you need to spend thousands on a system for it to work for you. We literally work with just about any budget, and can tailor a system for your needs, but it needs to be seen as an investment, as well. Give us a call for a free consultation. It’s not just a slogan; we really do love talking to people about security cameras.
  3. Now you have a good idea of the equipment you’ll need to cover the areas you need covered, you’ve picked the perfect system, gotten the layout perfect… but that camera just looks horrible at night. What?! Despite our best planning, we can’t escape physics. What do I mean by that? Well, during the day, cameras don’t have to deal with IR (infrared). It’s what makes seeing at night possible for CCTV cameras. It’s great, but also comes with a small drawback that needs to be planned for. That infrared light is going to reflect off of certain surfaces. Leaves, concrete, light colored walls, etc… Before you blame the camera, check to see if there’s any IR reflecting back into the camera off of any of the surfaces in your camera’s field of view. Debris, scratches or smudges on a Dome Style Security Camera are also a common culprit! Could be any of the above examples, so you may need to inspect and adjust your camera, or even trim some trees to eliminate this as an issue. Seems like kind of a pain, but we can assure you that the picture quality will drastically improve, so it’s well worth it. Try to include this in your planning and it will save you some trouble later in your install.
  4. One last thing to consider is whether you’d like to be able to monitor your CCTV system when you’re away from home or the office. If so, we’d be happy to help with this. Pretty much all CCTV systems these days have an app for viewing remotely. This can really be a great asset for home or business owners. Setting up alerts for movement, motion detection, etc… One thing, however, is that you need to plan a good, secure password for your system. Yeah, “Password1” is really easy to remember, but it’s… not good. At all. Pretty much every default password from every major manufacturer is available online. Leaving the default password on your DVR or NVR is like leaving your door wide open, with your collection of Rolex watches just inside, and a sign out front saying “Come on in!”. Anyone can log into your CCTV system and see your cameras. Live. Or worse. Check out our previous post called “Security for your Security” for more information on passwords and why you need a good one.

Let me end by saying that this isn’t an exhaustive list. There are going to be issues that may crop up. You may have a camera in your line-up that just doesn’t work for you. You may not have thought about bullet vs dome cameras. Maybe you need more storage space for your recording device. These are all things that we can assist with. With just a few minutes of consultation, we can maximize every dollar you invest, and make sure you get what you need out of your CCTV System! Give us a chance to show you why we love talking to people about security cameras. As stated above, it’s not just a catchy slogan (especially for a tech nerd like myself).

Call Us Toll Free at 877-880-7728